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Wicker: U.S. Will Not Betray Those Who Have Fought Crimes of the Putin Regime

ESPAÑOL DISPONIBLE AQUÍ:

WASHINGTON—Following Vladimir Putin’s proposal at the Helsinki Summit that Russian authorities question U.S. citizens whom the Kremlin accuses of committing crimes in Russia, Helsinki Commission Chairman Senator Roger Wicker (MS) issued the following statement:

“Vladimir Putin’s suggestion that the United States make American public servants available to Kremlin investigators is ludicrous. The White House needs to make clear that under no circumstances will the U.S. government hand over former U.S. Ambassador to Russia Michael McFaul, Helsinki Commission Chief of Staff Kyle Parker, or any other U.S. official for interrogation by a hostile foreign power. President Trump must also strongly oppose Putin’s proposal to question British citizen Bill Browder, who bravely exposed the murder of Sergei Magnitsky and brought it to international attention. The United States will not betray those who have fought the aggression and crimes of the Putin regime.”

From January 2012 to February 2014, Ambassador Michael McFaul served as the U.S. ambassador to the Russian Federation. Before becoming ambassador, he served for three years as a special assistant to the president and senior director for Russian and Eurasian Affairs at the National Security Council.

As a Helsinki Commission policy advisor from 2006 to 2014, Kyle Parker, who is now the commission’s chief of staff, led the development of the Magnitsky Act, a landmark law redefining human rights advocacy around the world. Prior to rejoining the Helsinki Commission in 2018, Parker served on the House Foreign Affairs Committee as Ranking Member Eliot Engel’s top expert, where he oversaw U.S. foreign policy toward the 50 countries and three international organizations (NATO, OSCE, and EU) covered by the Department of State’s Bureau of European and Eurasian Affairs.

Bill Browder, the founder and CEO of Hermitage Capital Management, was declared a “threat to national security” by Russia in 2005 as a result of his battle against corporate corruption. Following his expulsion, the Russian authorities raided his offices, seized Hermitage Fund’s investment companies, and used them to steal $230 million in taxes that the companies had previously paid. When Browder’s lawyer, Sergei Magnitsky, investigated the crime, he was arrested, tortured for 358 days, and killed in custody. Since then, Browder has fought for justice for Mr. Magnitsky. His campaigning led to the 2012 adoption of the Magnitsky Act, which imposed visa sanctions and asset freezes on those involved in the detention, ill-treatment, and death of Magnitsky (as well as in other human rights abuses). This law has become a model for subsequent U.S. sanctions against Russia.

 

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